Acute Peritonitis Secondary to Viscus Perforation in Bihar Population: A Retrospective Study

  • Srikant Gupta Assistant Professor, Department of General Surgery
  • Sudip Sarkar Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery
  • Sanjay Namadar Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery
Keywords: Bowel sounds, Distension of abdomen, Free fluid, Guarding and rigidity, Obliterated liver dullness

Abstract

Background: Peritonitis due to hollow viscus perforation is commonly encountered in surgical practice. It is defined as inflammation of the serosal membrane that lines abdominal cavity and the organs contained therein. It leads to various clinical complications. These complications have to manage by surgical approach.
Methods: Sixty patients of different age groups having peritonitis due to hollow viscus perforation as surgical emergency patient treated with laparotomy, anatomical locations, signs and symptoms abdominal X-ray, and ultrasound were studied.
Results: Clinical manifestations such as vomiting, fever, distension of abdomen, dehydration, guarding and rigidity, obliterated liver dullness, free fluid, and bowel sounds were noted. (A) Site of perforations 32 (53.3%) were gastric and duodenum, 2 (3.3%)were in jejunum, 15 (25%) in ileum, 9 (15%) in appendix, 2 (3.3%) in colon, (B) site of pain were 37 (61.6%)was diffuse pain, 6 (10%) had in rt. iliac fossa, 2 (3.3%) in rt. lumbar, 13 (21.6%) in epigastrium, 2 (3.3%) in rt. hypochondrium. (C) Pneumoperitoneum was in 43 (71.6%) patients. (D) Types of surgery were 34 (56.6%) omental patch closure, 9 (15%) were appendectomy, 7 (11.6%)were simple closure, 4 (6.6%)were resection and anastomosis, 6 (10%) were loop ileostomy. (E) Mortality was 9 (15%).
Conclusion: Early treatment of laparotomy for closure of perforation and omental patch closure is an ideal surgical management in acute peritonitis due to hollow viscus perforation.

Author Biographies

Srikant Gupta, Assistant Professor, Department of General Surgery

 Mata Gujri Memorial Medical College, Kishanganj, Bihar, India

Sudip Sarkar, Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery

 Mata Gujri Memorial Medical College, Kishanganj, Bihar, India

Sanjay Namadar, Associate Professor, Department of General Surgery

 Mata Gujri Memorial Medical College, Kishanganj, Bihar, India

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Published
2021-09-23
Section
Articles